SOLIDWORKS - Layout Based Assembly Modeling

This course covers using sketch blocks to design a robot arm and test movement, using the blocks to create 3d models, use sketch blocks to layout an assembly of a classroom, mate existing models to the blocks to test viewing range/comfort, and adjust arrangement using a 2d sketch of blocks instead of adjusting mates. Software required: SOLIDWORKS.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 27, 2016
Duration
1h 13m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jan 27, 2016
Duration
1h 13m
Description

Layout based modeling gives you whole new approach to design. Instead of sketching the same shapes over and over again, we can use blocks to reuse those shapes easily. At the assembly level, we can place those blocks and test if the assembly is even going to work before you have modeled a single 3d part! Once you've tested the assembly with blocks, you can use the blocks to build 3D parts. Watch this course to see how to use Layout Based Modeling at the Assembly level to conceptualize and build your designs much faster than before. Software required: SOLIDWORKS.

About the author
About the author

Shivani Patel is an Application Engineer at GoEngineer, which delivers software, technology, and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. An aerospace engineer by training, she has been using SOLIDWORKS and other CAD tools for 6 years.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
(light music) Hi, everyone. I'm Shivani Patel. I'm an elite applications engineer with GoEngineer and a certified SolidWorks expert. Welcome to my course on layout based assembly design. By now, you may be used to sketching and familiar with mating together models in an assembly. Layout based modeling gives you a whole other way to do this. Instead of sketching the same shapes over and over again, we can use blocks to reuse those shapes easily, and then we can lay out those blocks in the assembly level and test that the assembly is even going to work all before modeling a single 3D part. I'll show these concepts by beginning with commonly used sketches and assemblies like threads, gears, pulleys, company logos. Then together we'll build a working robot arm while focusing on motion and lay out a SolidWorks training classroom while focusing on visibility and comfort. By the end of this course, you should fully understand the potential of a layout based technique, and the only thing you need right now is SolidWorks and comfort sketching squares, circles, and lines. I hope you'll join me in my first module. (light music)

Using Blocks to Simplify Sketching Tasks and Assembly Design
In this first module, Using Blocks to Simplify Sketching Tasks and Assembly Design, we are going to build a working robot arm. We want the arm to have full motion within at least half a sphere of space. Using the knowledge we have right now, we'd have to model all the intricate pieces of the arm, assemble them together, and then test the range of motion. Doesn't this seem backwards? We're going to use a layout based assembly to test our arm before building a single 3D part. Let's go to our overview and see how. We have to start with an introduction to blocks. We'll build some commonly used blocks and see their uses in threads, gears, company logos, and pulley systems. This should give us a solid grasp on the fundamentals. Then we'll spend some time building up the various simple shapes we'll be using in our test robot arm. We'll then arrange them in what we call a layout sketch at the assembly level. This way we can test our range of motion and make any edits required. Finally, when the arm moves as we designed, we'll see how to turn the blocks into 3D parts and prevent duplication of effort.

Using Layout Based Assemblies
In this second module, using layout-based assembly design, we are going to lay out the GoEngineer SolidWorks training classroom. We want to find out the best arrangement of furniture to have a good comfort for the students and the best position for the projector and dry erase board for visibility. We're going to go back into layout sketches at the assembly level, but we'll now use them in three dimensions so that we can ultimately check visibility. Let's go to our overview so we can see how we'll build up to this step. Our first few steps will be building up the assembly layout sketch in two dimensions. We saw with the first module how easy rearranging components in 2D is, and we'll take advantage of that again. We'll make a top view of the room as our initial layout. The next step will be building into three dimensions. Since we're going to do this to check visibility, we'll draw on the walls and place anything that would hang on them into the layout. We'll also include parameters like seat height and monitor height. Our final step will be answering the questions, do students have enough space to sit and move comfortably throughout the room? Can the students see most, if not all of the board? And how many people can we comfortably fit in the room when we use it as event space? These are all important questions, and we'll see how easy it is to answer them using layout-based assembly modeling. With that, let's get started on the first step.