SOLIDWORKS Essentials - Basic Part Modeling

We need to model a part, but how do we get started? We need to think about what we are going to sketch and what kinds of tools we can use to get everything designed and a 2D drawing created. Software required: SOLIDWORKS.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 10, 2016
Duration
1h 40m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 10, 2016
Duration
1h 40m
Description

We are going to start modeling a sample part, but we need to learn the basics of starting a part, starting a sketch, and what entities we can sketch. When we are sketching, we need to learn about relationships and how dimensioning can help us go from an under defined sketch to a fully defined sketch. We will have features that add material and remove material. Once we are done, we will look at creating a 2D drawing with a front, top, right and isometric view. Software required: SOLIDWORKS.

About the author
About the author

Tony Riggs is an Elite Applications Engineer at GoEngineer, which delivers software, technology, and expertise that enable companies to unlock design innovation and deliver better products faster. He received a BSME from the University of Tulsa and has been using SOLIDWORKS for over 18 years.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, everyone, my name is Tony Riggs and welcome to my course on SOLIDWORKS Essentials basic part modeling. I'm an elite applications engineer at GoEngineer, a SOLIDWORKS reseller that sells and supports SOLIDWORKS in the south-central and western United States. I'm a mechanical engineer, certified SOLIDWORKS instructor, and certified SOLIDWORKS expert with about 18 years of SOLIDWORKS experience. As an application engineer, I have been responsible for training, technical support, and product demonstrations of SOLIDWORKS and several other products that we carry. In this course, we're going to look at starting a part, starting a sketch the right way, and see a few of the tools we need to get started. Some of the major topics are going to be starting a part in a sketch, and then learn how to draw lines, rectangles, circles, and other entities, then, how do we use relations and dimensions to define the shape of the sketch? Go on ahead and get an actual 3D model started and document everything with a 2D drawing. By the end of this course, you should be able to pick a good plan to get started and know what kind of things we can sketch. You can create fully-defined sketches and start extruding into 3D. Before beginning this course, you just need the desire to take it. You're designing from your imagination to the computer screen. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn SOLIDWORKS with the SOLIDWORKS Essentials - Basic Part Modeling course at Pluralsight.

Creating Your Part with Design Intent
Hello everyone. This is Tony Riggs. Welcome to the SOLIDWORKS Essentials course on Basic Part Modeling. If you're just learning to use SOLIDWORKS, there's a few lessons and tricks and tips we can give you on how to get started the best way. Design intent is a big part of our modeling. So let's take a look at the course overview. Creating your part with design intent. How do I get started? What plane do I use? We got the front, the top, the right plane. How do I start a sketch? There's a couple different ways and you'll typically find a favorite way. What can I sketch with? And how do I turn that into a 3D model? We'll see all of those different things in the first module. Secondly, after we've added material maybe we need to come in and add some custom remove material. Rounding off edges with fillets and we've got countersunk, counterbore, even slots, tapped holes, we'll see the whole wizard to help us out with that next step. Now we still need drawings, we're not quite a paperless society yet. Somebody needs something to manufacture off of or inspect with so we need some front, top, right isometric views. Different types of annotations. Center marks, weld symbols, surface finish symbols, all kinds of things like that, as well as dimensions. How big is the part? We need to convey information to the manufacturing team and on over to the quality checking team to see if the parts were manufactured right. So we're going to go through each of those different areas and get you a game plan on how to get started with your modeling.

Remove Material, Fillets, and Holes
So welcome back to module two, removing material, adding fillets and adding some holes. After the first module where we went through and added material to everything, removing material is the next logical step. So we'll see some of the commands for removing material, then we'll move on to adding fillets. Whether we remove material or add material with the fillet, they're both the same command so we'll see different options like tangent propagation. Adding holes. If we've got any complicated counter sink, counterbore, tapped, even slots, we can add those with the hole wizard. So let's see what we can do in module two.

Creating Drawings
Let's finish up our basic part modeling with our third module on creating drawings. Once we have a part modeled, we need to document it. We're going to come in and look at different ways to make front, top, right and isometric views, projecting views off of each other and just a few tricks on getting started. Adding some annotations and dimensions help round out the drawing, and finish things up so we can send it off to manufacturing.