Routing IPv4 and IPv6 for Cisco CCNA 200-125/100-105

Understanding how data moves across networks with IPv4 and IPv6 is the cornerstone of CCNA studies. This course explains in detail how IPv4 and IPv6 routing operates with extensive demonstrations to explain how routers move IP packets.
Course info
Rating
(35)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 30, 2016
Duration
4h 45m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Address Resolution Protocol
The Default Gateway
IPv4 Static Routing
Troubleshooting IPv4 Static Routes
IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Protocol
IPv6 Static Routing
Troubleshooting IPv6 Static Routing
Check Your Knowledge: Route Selection and Dual Stack
Check Your Knowledge: Static Routes in Redundant Networks
Description
Course info
Rating
(35)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 30, 2016
Duration
4h 45m
Description

The entire purpose of a router is to move packets from one interface to another. This course will explain in detail how IPv4 and IPv6 routing works. You will start by learning how ARP operates, allowing IPv4 packets to be sent in an Ethernet frame. Next, you will examine how you can get IP packets off of a network by using the default gateway configuration on a PC, and then take a look at what happens after the router receives the packet, and uses a route to forward the message. This course will describe how to specify and configure static routes for both IPv4 and IPv6. Throughout the course, you will look at troubleshooting tools, how to use them to effectively troubleshoot a network, and wrap up the course by looking at how you can set up a redundant IPv4 network using static routes.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello everyone, my name is Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to my course, Routing IPv4 and IPv6. I'm a network engineer with 20 years' experience building and managing enterprise networks and teaching people about them. Understanding how routers move packets from one interface to another is one of the cornerstones of the CCNA studies, so in this course we'll examine how ARP allows an IPv4 packet to get encapsulated inside of a frame. We'll also take a look at how IPv6 resolves IPv6 addresses into Mac addresses. We're going to implement static routes in both IPv4 and IPv6 and do a lot of troubleshooting of IPv4 and IPv6 networks. By the end of this course, you'll understand in great detail how messages can leave a work station in an IP packet, get routed through a network to the destination, as well as how to configure and troubleshoot static routing on routers. Before beginning this course, you should be very familiar with network layer addressing and Ethernet operation. And from here you should feel comfortable moving onto the rest of the courses in the CCNA series. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn IP routing with the Routing IPv4 and IPv6 course here at Pluralsight.

Address Resolution Protocol
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is Routing IPv4 and IPv6 for the Cisco CCNA exam, which is numbered 200-125, and then the 100-105 exam, which is the ICND1 exam. This module is going to focus on Address Resolution Protocol, or ARP. ARP is one of the most fundamental protocols in understanding how traffic moves from your workstation out to other devices on the network. I talk to network managers in the industry, and most of them will expect that an engineer can describe in detail how Address Resolution Protocol works when they interview potential future engineers. Let's look at what we're going to do this module. I want to examine a simple network and describe the IP packet. We're then going to examine what it looks like to send a ping message and walk through step-by-step what happens when we do send that ping message. I'm going to explain how Address Resolution Protocol works and aids in getting that ping message from one device to another device.

The Default Gateway
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This module is The Default Gateway. The goals of this module are to describe the default gateway, and then to describe how ping messages are routed to other networks through a default gateway. Now I'm using the ping message as a generic message that represents any messages that we're going to send across the network. Ping just happens to be a very easy protocol to use and understand, because there's not a lot of data that's required above the network layer of the OSI model.

IPv4 Static Routing
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is IPv4 Static Routing. Our goals this module are to describe a cross country trip in 1985. You'll see why I want to do this in just a minute. Next we're going to explain the static route, and then finally, implement static routing on a real network.

Troubleshooting IPv4 Static Routes
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is Troubleshooting IPv4 Static Routes. In this module, what I'd like to do is I'd like to examine some misconfigured static routes and then use ping, extended ping, and traceroute to find out about problems that can occur in our network. Now, I like to approach troubleshooting courses when we're looking at specific troubleshooting for routing here, like this, IPv4 Routing, I like to use some examples that I've seen students make and myself make errors with while setting up networks. So we're going to use these utilities to find out where the errors on our network is. We're also going to examine static routes that exist in the routing table versus the static routes that are configured and show up in the running config, because they're not always the same, and we need to be aware of that. Last, we're going to finish up this demonstration by looking at static routes; instead of using a next hop address, we're going to use an exit interface to implement the static route.

IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Protocol
Welcome to Pluralsight, this is Ross Bagurdes. This is IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Protocol. Now in IPv4, we learned about ARP, Address Resolution Protocol, which allows an IPv4 client to resolve the destination IPv4 address into that layer 2 MAC address, so we can build the frame. In IPv6 we do not have ARP, but what we do have is Neighbor Discovery Protocol. In this module, what I'd like to take a look at is what's the difference between a broadcast message and a multicast message. We will discuss how IPv6 builds a neighbor table, and that neighbor contains the IPv6 address to MAC address relationship. We'll demonstrate that IPv6 neighbor table, and really take a look at how IPv6 does this ARP-like behavior to allow us to get the MAC address for our destination IPv6 address.

IPv6 Static Routing
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is IPv6 Static Routing. IPv6 static routing and IPv4 static routing work very similarly, so we're going to start off by comparing the two static routing methods. Additionally, we're going to demonstrate how to implement IPv6 static routing in a small network.

Troubleshooting IPv6 Static Routing
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is Troubleshooting IPv6 Static Routing. What I'd like to do in this module is examine a misconfigured IPv6 router interface and see how that affects the client, especially when we're using SLAAC. I also want to examine the IPv6 unicast-routing command. Forgetting this command can cause some very unusual behavior and actually make it seem like your network is configured correctly, but it won't pass IPv6 traffic. And last, we'll look at the link-local versus the global unicast next hop address when we're doing static routing.

Check Your Knowledge: Route Selection and Dual Stack
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This module is Check Your Knowledge, and we're going to look at the route selection process, as well as examine and implement a dual stack IPv4 and v6 network. So our goals for this module then are really to look at the order of route selection, so that we know when a packet comes into a router and a router looks at the destination IP address, how does the router know which route to choose? In addition, we'll take a look at the default route as part of that process, so that our router has a mechanism of forwarding traffic and not having to keep an entire routing table for the whole internet. Last, we're going to do a dual stack implementation of IPv4 and IPv6 networks. So far we've only done either IPv4 or IPv6, and I haven't yet shown you anything where we actually implement both networks at the same time.

Check Your Knowledge: Static Routes in Redundant Networks
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this last module of Static Routing in IPv4 and IPv6, we're going to do a Check Your Knowledge, and we're going to take a look at static routes in redundant networks. So far we've implemented very simple static routing policies in very small networks, but what I'd like to do is add some redundancy in and see how those networks behave with static routes, which is going to be a perfect lead-in to dynamic routing. Our goals this module are to really look at how we get static routes to operate in redundant networks.