Oracle Database 12c Disaster Recovery and Data Movement

This course will give you the skills you need to perform backup and recovery for Oracle Database 12c under Microsoft Windows and Oracle Linux. You'll also get prepared to pass the Oracle Certified Administrator (OCA) certification exam in Oracle Database 12c.
Course info
Rating
(54)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 12, 2014
Duration
3h 26m
Table of contents
Configuring Backup and Recovery
Implementing Oracle Flashback
Performing Database Backups
Automating Database Backups
Performing Database Recovery
Moving Data
Exploring Oracle Database 12c Multitenant
Description
Course info
Rating
(54)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 12, 2014
Duration
3h 26m
Description

This Oracle Database 12c Disaster Recovery and Data Movement course accomplishes two goals. Number one, you'll learn how to ensure that your Oracle-stored data is always safe, secure, and able to be recovered in the event of a media failure. Number two, you'll move closer to your goal of becoming an Oracle Certified Database Administrator because this course is closely tracked to the exam objectives.

About the author
About the author

Timothy Warner is a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) in Cloud and Datacenter Management who is based in Nashville, TN.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Implementing Oracle Flashback
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner and you're watching the module entitled, Implementing Oracle Flashback. In this module we're going to become friends with an Oracle technology that I have a feeling, if you haven't already begun relying upon it quite a bit, you certainly will going forward because Flashback takes a lot of the stress off of our shoulders as Oracle administrators. We can do things like rewind a database or an individual table back to a previous point in time or to a particular system change number or scn. First though, we have to understand the terminology behind Oracle Flashback and understand those underpinnings before we start implementing it in Oracle Database. We're going to look at four members of the Flashback family in this module. We're going to start with Flashback Database, we'll do Flashback Table, Flashback Drop, and Flashback Data Archive, which is a technology that's of particular importance to those of you who are under strictures either governmentally, in the industry or both to keep into compliance with things like data retention policies. Let's get started.

Performing Database Backups
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner and this is the module entitled Performing Database Backups. In the previous module in this series we learned about Oracle backup and recovery basics. We spent a lot of our time there learning a lot of the fundamental vocabulary and setting up our database environment to actually perform backups. In this module we'll become familiar with one of my favorite Oracle terms. Well first, of course, we do have some additional terminology. There's always terminology in learning a new technology isn't there, but we'll spend our time during this module learning what RMAN or the Oracle Recovery Manager tool is, and then getting comfortable with its interface, actually using it. We'll ping pong in fact, between the command line interface and Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c, which gives you a really nice graphical frontend to RMAN, as we'll see shortly. We'll learn how to create the two, at least two actually, types of database backup. Consistent or a cold backup, inconsistent or a hot backup, and which one of those you choose is going to depend largely upon your environment and your business needs. We'll also learn how to create incremental backups to shorten our backup window. We'll learn just a little bit about automating database backups and managing our backup library. Those last two bullet points are going to form a lot of the next module where we take RMAN to the next level of expertise. Without any further ado, let's get started.

Automating Database Backups
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner and I'd like to welcome you to the module entitled Automating Database Backups. In the previous module I introduced you to the Recovery Manager or RMAN command line tool. We used RMAN to perform various backups of Oracle Database and database physical components. Here we're going to, in this module, extend upon that discussion. For instance, I gave you a little bit of information on the recovery catalog, a little bit on what it is and why it's important. We're going to broaden and deepen that discussion in this module and I'll actually show you how to create and use a recovery catalog. We'll then extend the discussion yet again, by learning how to automate database backups. In other words, to run RMAN backup jobs on a schedule. We'll learn to do that through the Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c console, through operating system level shell scripts, and also stored RMAN scripts. That is to say, RMAN scripts that are stored locally or globally in the recovery catalog. Lots to do in this module, so let's get started.

Moving Data
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Tim Warner and this is a module entitled Moving Data. Yes, we look at Oracle Database 12c as a secure safe for our line of business data, that's certainly true. Nevertheless, it's crucial that we understand, as DBAs, how to do data exports and imports. I can think of so many use cases right off the top of my head where you may be given tabular data in some generic format, maybe comma separated value format or XML format, that may have come from an external database, a non-Oracle database like MySQL or Microsoft SQL Server, and you need to absorb that data into Oracle Database. How do you do that? Even getting very simple, how would you copy or move data from one table in one schema to another schema, a new table, in the same database. You see what I mean? There's good use cases, not to mention covering the relevant certification objectives at play in this module. We're going to start this module by understanding the myriad ways that we can move data in Oracle Database 12c. The exam objectives call for two specific technologies. By the end of this module you'll understand how to use SQL*Loader to load or import data from a non-Oracle data source and you'll also understand what Data Pump is and how to use the Data Pump Export and Import utilities to migrate data between Oracle Databases. Good stuff here. Let's get to work.

Exploring Oracle Database 12c Multitenant
Hello and welcome to Pluralsight. Tim Warner here welcoming you to the module entitled Exploring Oracle Database 12c Multitenant. To be sure, the Multitenant architecture is Oracle Database 12c's most obvious and, in my opinion, most highly anticipated feature. If you've been following along in the courses that I've created for us here at Pluralsight, we've referenced the Multitenant architecture quite a bit, but never in any continuous stream. We're going to change that in this module. I want to make sure that you understand the answer to the question wait, so what is the difference between the CDB and the PDB again? In other words, I want to make sure that you can intelligently discuss that with colleagues, with your boss, whomever because frankly the Multitenant feature in Oracle Database 12c is likely to be a driver for many businesses to upgrade from 11g to 12c. After that we're going to get back to our regularly scheduled programming. Remember we're in the middle, we're actually --- past the middle. We're finishing up a course in disaster recovery, backup and recovery in Oracle Database, so I want to make sure you understand how to do the two major disaster recovery/maintenance operations with pluggable databases. Namely, I want to make sure that you understand how to unplug and replug PDBs, as well as back them up. Now don't worry about it. Let me tell you in advance that you don't have that big of a learning curve in front of you. For this being the big change in Oracle Database I think it's going to be somewhat anti-climactic to think that it's not that much of a paradigm shift and I'll explain myself more as we go on. Let's get started.