Introduction to Dynamic Routing for Cisco CCNA 200-125/100-105

Dynamic routing protocols are often the core of an enterprise network. This course will introduce the concept of dynamic routing and then examine OSPF operations as well as configuring a network to use OSPF.
Course info
Rating
(26)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 16, 2016
Duration
2h 57m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Protocols and Terminology
Introducing OSPF
OSPFv3
Troubleshooting OSPF
Check Your Knowledge
Description
Course info
Rating
(26)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 16, 2016
Duration
2h 57m
Description

Routing protocols are used to exchange routing information between routers so that engineers do not need to maintain complex static routing plans. In this course, Introducing Dynamic Routing for Cisco CCNA 200-125/100-105, you will examine the different types of routing protocols and their operation. You will start with examining the behavior of a simple dynamic routing protocol, then examine RIP and OSPF. Next, you will implement OSPFv3 for IPv6 networks. Finally you will examine the OSPF neighbor table, OSPF link state data base, and routing table for both IPv4 and IPv6. By the end of this course, you'll be able to implement the OSPF routing protocol to allow your network to dynamically exchange routing information, and create a redundant network.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to my course Introduction to Dynamic Routing. I'm a network engineer with 20 years experience building and managing enterprise networks and teaching people about them. One of the fundamental roles of a network engineer is to make sure packets can successfully pass through an internetwork, and dynamic routing protocols are invaluable in providing the mechanism to create these routing tables throughout the internetwork to provide the best path for a packet to travel, as well as self-heal the network when incidents occur. Some of the major topics we're going to cover include the basics of dynamic routing, as well as implementing Routing Information Protocol, or RIP. Additionally, we're going to understand and implement a single area Open Shortest Path First, or OSPF network. By the end of this course, you'll be able to implement the OSPF routing protocol and allow your network to dynamically exchange routing information and create a redundant network. Before beginning this course, you should be familiar with all the previous courses in the CCNA training series, and from here you should feel comfortable diving into the rest of the CCNA training. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn dynamic routing with the Introduction to Dynamic Routing course at Pluralsight.

Protocols and Terminology
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is Introduction to Dynamic Routing. This first module of our course is going to focus on protocols and terminology. We're going to look at why dynamic routing is so useful and how we implement and troubleshoot networks. But before we go into looking at how OSPF operates, let's look at some terminology and see how we classify our protocols. Our goals this module is to introduce dynamic routing. We're going to define what a metric is and then take a look at the difference between an Interior Gateway Protocol versus an Exterior Gateway Protocol. There's that word gateway again. Remember, anytime you hear the word gateway, we are usually referring to a router, especially in the land of CCNA. We're going to wrap this module up by demonstrating Routing Information Protocol, which is a relatively ancient routing protocol in the land of networking, but it also operates on a very simple premise. So we'll take a look at how that operates before we move into the more sophisticated protocol, like OSPF.

Introducing OSPF
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is Introducing OSPF, which is Open Shortest Path First, which is a very common open source routing protocol that's available to you to use on Cisco devices. Our goals this module are going to be to describe the OSPF process. We're going to take a look at some OSPF terminology and then actually go configure OSPF.

OSPFv3
Welcome to Pluralsight, I am Ross Bagurdes. This OSPF version 3, which is what we call OSPF for IPv6. The goals of this module are to describe OSPFv3 router ID. And then, we're going to configure OSPF version 3. But the nice part about OSPF version 3 is that for all practical purposes, its operation is identical to OSPF version 2, which is what we use for IPv4. So, here, all we're really going to do is talk about how OSPF version 3 uses the router ID, because this gets a little confusing for most students that are first learning about IP routing.

Troubleshooting OSPF
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This is Troubleshooting OSPF. A couple of things I'd like to take a look at in this module. Are look at some configuration issues that happen within OSPF. Now none of us are perfect when we're doing our configurations. I have watched many, many newbie network engineers configure OSPF incorrectly, so I've created a network that has some of those issues in it, and we're going to try to troubleshoot and figure out what's wrong without having to erase and start over our configuration. So I'll show you some utilities there. I'll also show you how we can set up OSPF in a way that makes our network get very ugly in a hurry, if we don't use the correct network statements. Second, we're going to do some troubleshooting using traceroute and I'm also going to show you how to change the bandwidth of our links that OSPF is using to calculate the best path, and then we can actually watch our network path change with that updated bandwidth.

Check Your Knowledge
In this last section of Introduction to Dynamic Routing, we're going to do a Check Your Knowledge, and what I'd like to do here is a couple things. One, I'd like to do a dual stack environment of IPv4 and IPv6 together. I already have IPv4 OSPF configured, so we're going to go and configure IPv6. And then we're going to wrap it all up by looking at how we can use CDP and the OSPF neighbor table to do some troubleshooting and make sure that we're neighbored up with all the right neighbors.