Advanced Routing for Cisco CCNA 200-125/200-105

This course will teach you how routes are added to a routing table, as well as how to tune and troubleshoot multi-area OSPF, EIGRP, and BGP.
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Mar 31, 2017
Duration
4h 3m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Advanced Static Routing
Dynamic Routing Protocol Categories
OSPF in a Broadcast Network
Multi-area OSPF
Multi-area OSPFv3
Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP)
Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)
Check Your Knowledge
Description
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Mar 31, 2017
Duration
4h 3m
Description

Routing protocols are mandatory for moving traffic across large networks. As networks grow in size, you need an understanding of how to manipulate the configurations of routing protocols to behave in a way that is consistent with the administrators design. In this course, Advanced Routing for Cisco CCNA 200-125/200-105, you'll learn what you need to know to be prepared for the Network Services for the CCNA 200-125 exam. First, you'll examine how the routing table operates. Next, you'll learn about advanced OSPF configuration including multi-area OSPF and auto-cost reference bandwidth. Finally, you'll explore EIGRP and BGP. By the end of this course, you'll be able to implement a tuned multi-area OSPF network where you choose the path of traffic through your network.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello everyone, my name is Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to my course Advanced Routing. I'm a network engineer with 20 years experience building and managing enterprise networks and teaching people about them. Although routing protocols seems like they make networking magical, they actually require a solid understanding of their operation, as well as an ability to tune the protocols to behave in a way that is consistent with the administrator's design. In this course, we'll examine Routing Table creation, advanced OSPF configuration, including multiple areas and the auto cost reference bandwidth feature. As well we'll look at EIGRP and BGP protocols. By the end of this course, you'll be able to implement a tuned multi-area OSPF network where you, the administrator, choose the path of the traffic through your network. Additionally, you will be able to configure BGP to learn the default gateway from your internet service provider. Before beginning this course, you should be familiar with the content provided in the CCENT learning path series of courses. From here, you should feel comfortable moving onto the Network Services for the CCNA 200-125 exam. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn more sophisticated features of routing protocols, with the Advanced Routing course at Pluralsight.

Advanced Static Routing
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. Let's start this new course of Advanced Routing for Cisco CCNA 200-125 and 200-105, which is the ICND2 exam. In this first module, we're going to discuss advanced static routing. Our goals this module are to explain IP route summarization, where it can take multiple networks and combine them into one single route statement. We're going to describe the route selection process so that we can understand how when a packet arrives on a router, the router decides which interface to send that packet out of, and then we're going to implement a small network with route summarization.

Dynamic Routing Protocol Categories
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This next module we're going to look at dynamic routing protocol categories. Now this is a review from the ICND1 material where we began to look at dynamic routing protocols. I wanted to re-review this, so that as we move into talking about both interior and exterior gateway protocols, we have a good baseline to begin with. So, the goals to do this is going to look at the difference between interior and exterior gateway routing protocols. We're going to look at the administrative distance for each one of those routing protocols, as well as the metric that is used to determine the best path through those systems.

OSPF in a Broadcast Network
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next module, I'd like to take a look at OSPF and how it behaves in a broadcast network. Now, a broadcast network is effectively ethernet, and what I want to look at here is how does OSPF behave when we have multiple routers using OSPF all connected to the same network segment? Now, this really isn't the best design idea ever. It is a relatively complicated and sophisticated setup for OSPF. It takes awhile to explain, and we're probably never going to use it. However, it is important that we also understand how OSPF behaves in this environment, and it should lend a clue as to why we may not want to use it as well. So, our goals this module will be to examine the OSPF neighbor relationship process, and then take a look at how OSPF builds neighbors on a broadcast network to be more efficient. Last, I'd like to demonstrate OSPF in a broadcast network to see how OSPF will build neighbor relationships when we have more than two routers on one segment.

Multi-area OSPF
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next module, I'd like to explain multi-area OSPF and then demonstrate it. So our goals here are going to be to review OSPF terminology, and then introduce multi-area OSPF and explain its value and how it operates. Then we're going to configure a small multi-area OSPF network.

Multi-area OSPFv3
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. Let's take a look at multi-area OSPFv3, which is OSPF for IP version 6. What I'd like to do in this module is go over the OSPFv3 router ID and its configuration, as well as configure OSPFv3 in a multi-area environment. Now OSPF in a multi-area environment works about the same in v2 as it does in v3, with the exception of how we work the router ID. So let's take a look at how the OSPF v3 router ID works. The OSPFv3 router ID, which is the IPv6 version of OSPF, that router ID is written in the format of an IPv4 address. This is just like the router ID in OSPFv2. It is written in the format of an IPv4 address. The critical component of this statement is in the format of, meaning that it is not an IPv4 address. It's not an IPv4 address. The router ID here in OSPFv3 is written in the format of an IPv4 address, but it isn't an address. And each router ID is unique for every router. So we cannot have duplicate router IDs on our devices. The range of our router ID can go from 0. 0. 0. 0 through 255. 255. 255. 255. So, when we're configuring this, we can keep these router IDs very simple. We don't have to worry about public and private IP addresses, because a router ID in OSPF is not an IP address. It is only written in the format of one.

Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP)
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next module, we're going to discuss EIGRP or Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol. Our goals are to examine EIGRP terminology, and then take a look at how EIGRP operates. Then we're going to go implement and do some troubleshooting with EIGRP for IPv4, and then do the same thing for IPv6.

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagures. In this module, we're going to talk about Border Gateway Protocol, or BGP. Border Gateway Protocol is a very sophisticated protocol that is used to connect multiple ISPs together and transfer routes based on some policy. We're going to look at it from a very specific point of view, and the view we're going to look at it from is that of somebody in an enterprise network needing internet services. So, what we're going to do is we're going to describe our need for BGP. We're going to explain redundant internet access possibilities with BGP, and then do a demonstration of BGP and the default route. As a CCNA holder, your experience with BGP in an enterprise network is mainly going to be working with an internet service provider or two internet service providers to get yourself internet access and possibly redundant internet access. Before we get into BGP, I want to mention something very quickly. The names I've chosen for all of the businesses in this demonstration are an homage to those who have helped me so much with the CCNA series. One of those guys is Myles Wilson. He is a master editor. He is the one that makes me sound good in the presentations. Another guy here, Anton 'tkap' Kapela, my buddy Tony, who is a CTO over at 5NINES, he helps me with the technical inconsistencies that come across when I'm recording these videos. And then last, Barry Gross, he is the manager of enterprise networking over at UW Hospital and Clinics. Barry is my lifeline to understand what's happening in enterprise networking, as well as helping me produce these videos. So, these three guys are outstanding help, brilliant folks there.

Check Your Knowledge
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. Let's wrap up this advanced routing course with a module on Check Your Knowledge, where we take a look at some of the more complex topics in advanced networking. The goals this module are going to be to discuss the OSPF auto cost reference bandwidth, which is a value that is used to calculate the cost in OSPF. Second, we're going to take a look at how we redistribute the default route in both OSPF and EIGRP. We're also going to take a look at what routing tables look like when we have three routing protocols enabled here, or at least two dynamic routing protocols, and then a static route. And then last, we're going to wrap up by discussing a lazy OSP configuration that has the potential to cause some very difficult to troubleshoot issues, and we don't need to create the situation where those difficult to troubleshoot issues arise. So we'll take a look at that lazy OSPF configuration as well.