Network Services for Cisco CCNA 200-125/200-105

In this final course consisting of new topics in the CCNA training series, you'll examine some services that run on top of a network that is already functioning, and discover ways to improve and manage a network.
Course info
Rating
(11)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 25, 2017
Duration
2h 16m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(11)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 25, 2017
Duration
2h 16m
Description

There are a tremendous number of protocols used to build a network, and most of these protocols are required to allow a network to pass traffic. However, in order for an engineer to maintain a quality and highly available network, you need additional protocols to help manage the network itself. In this course, Network Services for Cisco CCNA 200-125/200-105, you'll examine services an engineer can use to help improve the network. First, you'll learn protocols and services that provide redundancy, quality of service, centralized authentication, network monitoring, and vitalized networking. Additionally, you'll learn how to implement Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) in a small network, which will allow an engineer to provide a redundant default gateway. Finally, you'll discover how you can use SNMP and IP SLA to monitor a network. Since Software Defined Networking (SDN) has been implemented in real products now, you'll examine Cisco's products for SDN including terminology used to describe the system. By the end of this course, you'll be able to implement a redundant default gateway using HSRP, create an IP SLA ICMP policy, and understand how Cisco has implemented SDN.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, everyone, my name is Ross Bagurdes and welcome to my course, Network Services. I'm a Network Engineer with 20 years experience building and managing enterprise networks and teaching people about them. As you have seen throughout this series, there are a tremendous number of protocols used to build a network and most of these protocols are required simply to allow the network to pass traffic. However, in order for an engineer to maintain a quality and highly available network, we need additional protocols to help manage the network itself. In this course, we will examine Hot Standby Router Protocol; Quality of Service; Authentication, Authorization and Accounting; Software Defined Networking; Simple Network Management Protocol; and IP Service Level Agreements. By the end of this course, you will be able to implement a redundant default gateway using HSRP, create an IP SLA ICMP policy and understand how Cisco has implemented Software Defined Networking. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the information provided in the previous CCNA Learning Path series of courses. Since this is the last course of new content for the CCNA, you should feel comfortable moving on to CCNA Troubleshooting and Review course for the CCNA 200-125 exam. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn about protocols used to manage the network with the Network Services course at Pluralsight.

Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP)
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This course is Network Services for the Cisco CCNA 200-125 or 200-105 Exams. Those are the CCNA exam and the ICND2 exam, respectively. This course is the last course in the CCNA series where I'll cover new material. The last course that's going to follow this one is going to be a wrap-up course, where we're going to build a lab combining all the critical components of the CCNA, and start to do some troubleshooting and analysis of it. This module of this course is Hot Standby Router Protocol, or HSRP, and the nerdiest side of me, the nerdiest network engineer in me, knows that HSRP is actually one of my favorite protocols to use and play with in data networking. Let's take a look at what it is. Our goals this module are going to be to define the benefit of a redundant default gateway, we're going to describe HSRP operation, and then implement HSRP.

Quality of Service (QoS)
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. Let's move into this next module which is called, Quality of Service or QoS. What I'd like to do here is discuss the need for quality of service. We're going to explain what queues are and how we use them. We'll describe QoS operation. And then we'll talk about the difference between integrated services or IntServ verses DiffServ or differentiated services.

Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA)
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. This next module we're going to discuss authentication, authorization, and accounting, or AAA. Now, in the United States we have AAA to help us with our automobiles, should we need some roadside assistance when we're traveling, or maybe we need some maps. But when we're talking in data networking and server LAN, AAA is referring to this authentication, authorization, and accounting. Our goals for the module are to look at the different authentication mechanisms we can implement on Cisco devices. We're then going to look at AAA and see what it does, and then we are going to take at the differences between RADIUS and TACACS, which are two types of AAA servers. Then we'll take a look at LAN authentication using 802. 1x. Then we'll wrap up the module by demonstrating RADIUS authentication using a Cisco router and a free RADIUS server running on Linux.

Next Generation Networks
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This module, we're going to talk about next generation networks. There's a lot of ambiguity about what next generation networks might look like, so let me try to break it down as best as I possibly can for you, and we'll try to demystify things like software defined networking. So what I'd like to start with here is talking about virtual networking. Virtual networking is a term that I'm using here to describe when we are using our hardware and abstracting different components of it out to virtualize it. And so we'll take a look at an example here, VLANs being the number-one use of virtual networking today. We're then going to look at software defined networking. We're going to looking at a definition of SDN. Next, we're going to look at Cisco's implementation of software defined networking, which is called Cisco ACI. We'll then take a look a something called APIC-EM, which is a tool Cisco has introduced to allow you to use your current hardware, if it's compatible, to have a central management authority for it, and that's its APIC-EM tool, and then what I'll do is actually demonstrate this APIC-EM Trace Tool in the DevNet sandbox from Cisco. So Cisco has a sandbox set up where we can play, and I can demonstrate what that APIC-EM Trace Tool is doing.

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes, let's talk about simple network management protocol, or SNMP. Our goals this module will be to introduce SNMP. We're going to talk about SNMP traps, and SNMP walks, and then we're going to compare the different versions of SNMP.

IP Service Level Agreement (IP SLA)
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. This module is IP Service Level Agreements, which is a term that I think Cisco misuses a bit here, or it's actually a little bit misleading, but we'll sort that all out in this module. Know that if you've reached this point in the courses, if you've been following them in order you have now reached the very last new topic in your CCNA studies. From this point on, everything after this for the next module and for the last course in this series is going to be all review of stuff that I've already covered. What we're going to do is just put it together in a new way. So congratulations on reaching this last new topic here. Let's talk about what I'm going to discuss. I want to start with service level agreements in general. Service level agreements, or SLAs, are typically business agreements, so I want to talk about what that is. I want to talk about network monitoring, which is more of the point of Cisco's IP SLA. We'll then introduce IP SLA and discuss what the features are. And then we'll do a demonstration implementing a very simple IP SLA using ICMP configuration.

Check Your Knowledge
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this last module of our network services course, I'd like to do a check-your-knowledge section about IPv6 access control lists. I did a whole course on access control lists, however, we did not cover IPv6 ACLs. In this course, I'd like to discuss some of the subtle differences in an IPv6 ACL. To do this, I'd like to review our IPv6 layer 2 resolution system, which uses neighbor discovery protocol. I'd then to review the IPv4 ACL implicit rules that we find when we're writing access control lists in IPv4. I'd then like to describe the IPv6 access control list implicit rules, and then implement and troubleshoot an IPv6 access control list on a small network.